News

21 June 2017

Pair of chairs for Walter Morrison (1836-1921): a new discovery


Walter Morrison, the ninth (of eleven) children born to James Morrison (1789-1857) and his wife Mary (1795-1887) was just twenty-one when his father died leaving him £300,000 (a fortune that today would be the equivalent of £28m) and the Malham Estate in Yorkshire.  While he never needed to work, he inherited the Morrison habit of public service, first sitting as a radical reforming Member of Parlaiment from 1863-74; acting as treasurer to the Palestine Exploration Fund for 54 years, and performing ...

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29 March 2017

Expertise and enthusiasm: present and future appreciation of the decorative arts

For many years now, there has been a perception that so-called 'traditional areas' under the umbrella of the 'decorative arts' have fallen from favour.  But what does this mean?  Is this a reference to the market, or to public appreciation?  Surely it is the case that that those who pack National Trust houses each year; who travel far and wide to visit museums and churches, and who book tickets for exhibitions such as 'Jerusalem 1000-1400 Every People Under Heaven' (Metropolitan Museum of Art, Sep...

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6 March 2017

TEFAF, Maastricht, 2017: still the best


We spent an enjoyable weekend unpacking a truck-full of crates, each revealing a piece of furniture, an object or a picture, soon to be placed or hung on our expanded Maastricht stand.  Thanks as ever to Aston Spinks (see below) and Nicky Aubury, the stand was set and lit by Monday morning.

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18 January 2017

The Winter Antiques Show: ready to go


On Tuesday morning, so far spared the traditional Winter Antiques Show snow, we arrived at the nonetheless frigid Armory. Our shippers battled the mêlée of ‘troublesome trucks’ jockeying for position on a gridlocked Lexington Avenue. 

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12 December 2016

Sitting comfortably, on chairs designed by Thomas Chippendale the Younger


During a recent visit to Salisbury, I took some time to enjoy the magnificent cathedral.  Walking past the north transept, my eye was caught by a life-size seated figure.  On inspection this turned out to be a funerary monument to Richard Colt Hoare (1758-1838), the antiquarian owner of Stourhead, Wiltshire (above). 

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